Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Nothing special
--Pork Tenderloin Slices Gourmet



Pork Tenderloin Slices Gourmet
The New Antoinette Pope School Cookbook Copyright 1961

¼ cup hot butter or shortening I used some canola oil
1 pound pork tenderloin sliced 1/3 inch thick
1 teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon black pepper
1 cup chili sauce or catchup I used some of both
¼ cup stock or water I used water
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon onion salt
½ teaspoon monosodium glutamate I omitted this
¼ teaspoon dried rosemary crushed

Sauté sliced tenderloin in hot butter over moderate heat until brown on one side. Season with salt and pepper, and brown other side.

When meat is browned on both sides, add all other ingredients. Cover saucepan, and simmer meat about 20 minutes, or until tender. Do not overcook. When done, serve it in center of a bed of well buttered seasoned green noodles or rice. I served it with mashed potatoes.

Serves 3.
___________________

This recipe was fine but nothing extraordinary. It used ingredients I had on hand which is always a plus. My son ate quite a bit of it too which was great. I think he's been going through a bit of a growth spurt. I probably won't make this recipe again but only because I have so many great recipes for pork tenderloin.

Many of my older cookbooks use monosodium glutamate (MSG, 'Accent') quite a bit. Now there's an ingredient that went out of favor! I can remember seeing commercials for it but I don't think my mom kept it in the house. I wonder if it really made a difference.

My energy level has dipped again. I'm going to have to chose some super easy recipes for next week in case things continue this way.

Blast From the Past: Creole-Style Pork Tenderloin Patties from July 2007, also from this same cookbook. I enjoyed that recipe more.

Question of the Day: Have you ever used monosodium glutamate at home? Did it make a difference?

3 comments:

DancesInGarden said...

We did, at least at some point in the 80's for a while. I remember it making a big difference in chicken dishes and soups. Yet I don't feel the need to use it now or have it on hand.

. . . said...

nope. never tried it. i've never been tempted to, either. in fact, before you said 'msg,' i was thinking "what on earth is that?" lol

Anonymous said...

I've had it in my pantry since the '70's. We started using it on vegetables, but used it less and less. Whether it makes a difference or not, I don't really know. Maybe in your mind. However, to this day, DH always uses it when he barbecues.

Jan